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conservative, conservative on foreign policy and military policy, and on social issues we would be libertarian. i think that party could be a majority party. >> a party in search of voters. that's next. ♪ [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... inspired by a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ perform, compete and grow. and people are driving this change. that's the power of human resources. the society... for human resource management and its members know... how to harness that power, because we help develop it. from the next economy, to the next generation, we help get... the most out of business, by getting the best out of people. shrm. leading people, leading organizations. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. i
be a republican party that was fiscally conservative, conservative on foreign policy and military policy, and on social issues we would be libertarian. i think that party could be a majority party. >> a party -- the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... inspired by a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ let's say you want to get ahead how do you get from here... to here? at university of phoenix we're moving career planning forward so you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 you know, the one that's been lying around. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k)
the argument on foreign policy in part because a lot of people are sick of the two wars that george w. bush got us into. that's just a fact. gorgeous george w. bush's type of republic party mitt romney as todd akin richard mourdock in another. >> very good with latinos, kevin mccarthy. we have some bright new leaders and we need to have more of those. >> george w. bush's policies spending and two wars ended up also delivering barack obama into the white house. but let's start with you, chip. your take where we are. what do you think of my point that romney ran a defensive campaign but he also did have to deal with the bush baggage, credibility on spending, and a foreign policy that was frankly the by product of the hopeful but ultimately rather confused and unsuccessful policy in the middle east? >> yeah. i think you are spot on. first, let me say i aspire to be one of those old white guys. >> laura: and rich. >> definitely be a rich old white guy no question. that's what i aspire to be. no question a heavy load for romney. to thine ownself be true. we know who we are as a party. center right p
to driving foreign policy that can't be overlooked. >> eliot: tina? >> his speech at the convention was an audition piece. >> eliot: not every audition works. >> yes. that was a kerry no one saw before. i was -- in the stadium. people were kind of -- sighed when he got up there. he knocked it out of park. >> eliot: people remembered that. >> he was the surprise sleeper speaker. >> eliot: treasury, tim geithner leaving. does he take somebody from wall street? >> undoubtedly. >> eliot: you think he does? >> absolutely. >> eliot: come on! so many people understand banking finance better than those guys. >> yes. ralph nader. >> eliot: robert rice. i would put him in any cabinet position. host of new york 1 errol louis and editor tina but dupuy. our special election night of the view finder is ahead. more "viewpoint" coming up. [ forsythe ] we don't just come up here for the view up in alaska. it's the cleanest, clearest water. we find the best sweetest crab for red lobster that we can find. [ male announcer ] hur
-- institute. i'm delighted to see all of you today. i think the interest in foreign policy and the wake of our presidential election is evident by the standing room only crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle that may have an impact on the policy process. so, i take it that it is a good sign that there is a much interest in the foreign-policy process by your presence here today. i think the transition from a first to second on the administration may begin the day after election, but it does not end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the new old team goes through the inevitable time of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, but fiscal cliff for example, and packed for policy. let's not forget, as the world rick roberts to the changes -- or some people get -- some people say, a lack of changes -- here in washington. let's not forget that hist
american. and all three are very conservative on foreign policy. some domestic policies, they will find ortiz and rubio will slightly lead some of the charge in the republican ranks in the senate to adopt some kind of comprehensive immigration reform. i think the time has come for the country to do comprehensive reform. as i have said many times over the last year or two, immigration reform is going to change the politics of the nation just by the nature of who eventually becomes or is able to regularize their status and be able to vote. it was ronald reagan in 1986 who signed into law the last comprehensive immigration reform, which allowed about 3 million people to regularize their status -- most of them hispanic. within five years, those people were able to vote. effecting much of what happened in the clinton era in terms of what was happening in democratic resurgence. i think this time around, we're talking 11 million to 12 million people. immigration reform is accomplished next year, did you can assume within five, six, seven years many of those people will then be able to enter th
. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening now, a dangerous new foreign policy challenge for president obama as word comes that iranian fighter jets have fired -- fired on an unarmed u.s. drone over the persian gulf. you know all about the rallies and political ads, but you'll be surprised to learn how much the obama campaign knew about you. how data mining and number crunching helped re-elect the president. and it may sound strange, but there's already some buzz out there about the next presidential election. we're going to hear about potential candidates for 2016. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama scored a pretty convincing re-election. the president has four more years to pursue his agenda. what can he actually accomplish? john king is joining us now. he's got major challenges and what's on his mind obviously is what's good for the country and his historic legacy. >> you talk about the l word, legacy, whenever someone's re-elected. a closely divided congress, a republican ho
reason for failures on foreign policy, regulating the financial markets and we had a president who came in and often in unpopular ways at first, basically said government has an important role to play in all of these markets, the insurance market, the car market, small business, tax reform and he went and did that when it was unpopular. and by the end of the race, we had a substantive debate about it. and what we see here i think is an endorsement of an obamaism. of an approach here that 00:30:embrace s government to do things for people. >> all the political math we know says the president can't be re-elected with unemployment up near 8%. it cannot happen. it staes an extraordinary campaign to be able to do that. >> i think that is true. on the other hand it is very hard to unseat incumbent presidents. about 70% of incumbent presidents are re-elected. ronald reagan was re-elected in a land slide suggesting there was some room for unemployment to be higher. the president did run a fantastic campaign. they understand america as it exists today. republicans tried to convince themselves th
what you are saying. the demos don't care about the foreign policy. >> bob: part of it. the demo is the demo. we are talking about -- >> greg: i agree, i agree, bob. conservatives have to find a way to reach out to the new demographics and explain why freedom is better than free stuff. they have to do it and do it soon. they are getting young people like eric said involved in the process. having said that, the media interspearing iinterfering in oe biggest scandals in ten years is awful. it had to have. by the way, we're armchair quarterbacking. that's what we do here. >> bob: i understand that. you have to look at the largeer picture here. if the republicans not to recognize a problem, and look at it as sandy and the rest of it is disservice to themselve themselves. >> kimberly: it's just not that simplistic. factors, we said he had an excellent get out the vote. even knows that. this is a campaign, they had excellent strategy. they played well. they knew what it took to win. that is it. what do you want me to say? bottom line. >> bob: republicans had no strategy to attract -- o
tonight. for more on the larger impact of the scandal let's bring in the foreign policy expert, james traub. mr. traub, you usually inform us about deeply important things going on in afghanistan iraq, around the world. now we're talking about e-mails and tawdry behavior. >> it is like a novel. i'm reading the kind of novel i don't normally read. >> eliot: we know you read them but that's okay. >> yeah. it's just -- it's like watching a car pileup, right? you really think i don't want to know this. you keep watching, reading. you love it. but how much of this matters? how much does it matter to us? not to holly petraeus. does it matter to us that david petraeus had an affair with paula broadwell. allegedly it does because he's the head of the c.i.a. and he could be blackmailed. well that's like boris and natasha stuff to me. this must have been true. it was true in the 1950s. who's going to be blackmailing him? the russians or the chinese are going to say we're going to tell the world you had an affair or otherwi
and mythologying general pelt race. a roommate in baghdad was involved in one of the most recent foreign policy debacles is addressing general petraeus. those raising those concerns, you might not get that from cnn a spokesperson for the pentagon in many ways. >> our own notebook there a body slam of cnn and the generals. i want to show you cnn's reaction. >> bob is not a spokesperson for the agency. >> i followed her coverage closely. >> just because she's written naughty things about you doesn't make her a spokesperson. >> what makes her a spokesperson is repeating a lot of pentagon claims. >> journalists who challenge the government are seen as oh, wacky outsiders, and the only thing that ever gets you in trouble is not reckless wars that kill hundreds of thousands of people, but sex. >>t b binng, i washinking e same thing why is this going on because of a sex scandal, it's between him and his wife. but then, a few other angles came saying this could be a security issue who knew, who didn't know. i'm fine with all those questions being answered. what's weird and i understand from a different
-- statehood party in puerto rico. issueset's talk about and how they impacted voters. foreign policy, what were voters' attitudes about foreign policy issues? guest: the exit poll asked people what their most important issue was. the economy was way up on top, almost 3/5ths of people said the economy was the number-one issue. the percentage who said that foreign policy was the most important issue was down in the single digits. that is not the driver. foreign policy is usually not the biggest driver. it is worth noting that those voters who said that foreign policy was the most important issue, president obama won that group. host: that made for about 5%. the economy, 59% put that as the most important issue. federal budget deficit, 15%. talk about how the health care law played into voters' attitudes? 18% said it was the most important issue. guest: that is an important thing. almost one in five voters said that health care was the most important issue. the president won roughly three- quarters of that vote. throughout the republican primaries, the issue of obamacare was a huge rallying c
: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. so that has been one caution. then the next step would likely be considering some sort of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran's nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's lap. it is probably strategically
that there are many people who can fill this hole. i wished there was a different approach to foreign policy. a less militarized one. that emphasizes political solutions. >> can i say one thing? for many journalists at our news organization, we have world renowned journalists. let me say, there are a lot of people who vework very hard at r organization. >> when did the fbi really start to know about this and how up -- >> several months. >> -- presumably the fbi director knew, did they tell the white house council office? >> and the judge who might have signed the warrant to get these records. >> to be told tuesday at 5:00 p.m. on election day, frankly, it doesn't pass the smell test. >> that's why i asked senator chambliss about that as well. he insist he wasn't told until friday. we have the evidence that some whistle blower came forward. >>> lots more roundtable coming up. more on the fiscal cliff. who has the upper hand there? deal or deadlocked? plus president obama sweeps the battlegrounds. did mitt romney throw away a winning hand? >>> were you surprised by the results? >> a little. i mean, co
kinnon, sam stein, eric bates. foreign policy and finger pointing take center stage as republicans zero in on president obama's cabinet. the back and forth over benghazi and embassy rice with former governor bill richardson. the president tours storm damage in new york, addressing climate stage. we'll talk with deputy mayor wolfson when "now" starts in a mere 180 seconds. [ birds chirping ] are you sure you can fit in there? [ chuckles ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] around view monitor with bird's-eye view. nice work. [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new nissan pathfinder. it's our most innovative pathfinder ever. nissan. innovation that excites. ♪ [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit or call 1-800-medicare. so now's the time. you a "stag provisions"rule
. she's the one -- she's a very talented diplomat. skilled foreign policy. she's been doing this for awhile. very well respected in the industry. suddenly she gets on tv, the administration -- she has a trusted face. she's given this from c.i.a. so the white house has said, what the c.i.a. has said and you know, it points to the video. that's what they had at the time. it is proven to be mostly false. there is -- clear bit of planning going on before that. but you know, so there is probably more upset than susan rice herself. and you know, you have the story of this -- she can't be nominated. for secretary of state or if you did, we would filibuster it but not using the word filibuster because that would be obstructionist. everything in our power. not going to use the magic word to actually stop it. >> john: they don't have to. they're very good at it and democrats let them. number one with the video. our embassy was attacked over that video. our embassy in cairo. and the american flag was torn down a fe
on filibuster reform. the president wheen tile always going to have work to do on the foreign policy front. he likely mr. see if we can work a deal with iran, and forge a new relationship with china. russia is indicating an interest in working with the u.s. on nuclear non-proliferation, and there is the ongoing volatility in the middle east. all of these as the administration undergoes significant personnel and cabinet changes that come with a second term. we're back with more after the break. stay with us. ♪ >>tax cuts don't create jobs. the golden years as the conservatives call them, we had the highest tax rates, and the highest amount of growth, and the highest amount of jobs. those are facts. >>"if you ever raise taxes on the rich, you're going to destroy our economy." not true! what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new
on some of the foreign-policy stuffy has espoused and may disagree with him on that, and that's fine, but he engages you in a debate of ideas around some really strong principles, like the constitution. ron paul will estimate bridget still be a strong player. his son will be a very important voice in the next year or so. i get it. my style is not necessarily the warmest for some conservatives who like the it straight laced stand in the background. i thought of the chairmanship needed to be a vibrant part of the political process. that meant putting it out on the street. that meant doing some shows that were not necessarily traditional for the rnc chairman to do. i just felt very strongly, and i still do, that the power does not rest down here but arrests out in america in the streets. you saw this happen again in this election. it was all race centralized back in washington because we will tell you how to do it because we know best. the reason they hired me was to come in and break that up. some did not like that, whoever else down in other parts of the country and that's fine. the g
. followed by prime minister david cameron's spetch on foreign policy at the annual lord mayor 's man quet. this will be the third time speaking before the banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. and then later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. now a discussion about the results of the 2012 election with media research president brent bozell, coordinator for the tea party patriots and president of the susan b. anthony list. from the press club, this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is richard vigory, chairman of the i will speak for a few minutes and introduce five nationally known, recognized conservative leaders. and we will each talk for a little bit and then we will open it for q & a. battle to take over the republican party begins today. and the failed republican leadership should resign. out of last night's disaster comes good news, ho
with mitt romney, governor romney for not mentioning it. and the third debate on foreign policy, he didn't mention veterans one time and in his 45-minute acceptance speech. but what's important is now that that election is over, craig, we need to come together as americans, democrats and republicans. to do all we can to help these public/private partnerships to be there for these heroes. craig, as you know, it's less than 1% of americans have served in iraq or afghanistan. and over, almost 500,000 of them, suffer from post traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury. that's the signature wound of these wars. we need to learn the lessons from world war ii, from korea, from vietnam. from desert storm that we're going to do all we can as a nation to take care of these heroes when they come home. >> congressman, i want to go inside the campaign for a few moments here before i let you go. there's the, there's a report today in "the wall street journal" i want to throw up a full screen here, it describes the negative attacks that the obama campaign ran early on. it describes them as pa
a foreign policy legacy that he didn't have the political capital to do in his first term. if i were the obama administration, i would appoint bill clinton as a middle east peace envoy. he has credibility both on the israeli street and in the arab world with the camp david accord s and with the clinton global initiative. we, as americans, the united nations has to get involved. we have to send a message to both israel and palestine that there's absolutely no military violence solution to the israeli/palestinian conflict. it can only be a peaceful and political one. >>> today's talk back question, should [ male announcer ] with 160 more miles per tank, the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. . >>> now is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. the question for you this morning, should politicians have a mandatory retirement age? it was a simple question, if you're 27. or maybe those over 50 are way too sensiti
republican strategy? they are social, economic, and foreign policy, fully embracing each one. what we had was one wobbly leg with about $1 billion from the republican side from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of that influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas, a real mandate is created, and there is a resonance that brings public policy leaders into office so those areas can be implemented, without fully engaging on each of those areas and social policy, we leave the votes on the table every single time. what we had was a factor truth on social issues on one side but a full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. obama have launched a war over abortion and the life issue. therefore, he got to completely decide what the issue was, and what is it? rape. abortion and rape in the minds of many voters, because the debate was not fully engage. his weaknesses, is extreme positions on late storm abortions -- late term abortions, i'm not saving children born after a failed of abortion, none of these were explored in a
through foreign policy magazine, tom ricks, author of "the generals." not everything that you found is necessarily that great about modern day generals today. >> before we go there, start with the model general. you say the model general was general george marshall who gave his generals a few months to succeed, die or be relieved. >> that was accountability. that was the way they worked in world war ii. you get out there and if you can't do the job, we will get rid of you. 155 division commanders in the army in world war ii. of the guys who commanded, 16 were fired. what -- it was a darwinian process. very hard-nosed, not gentle. and they moved up guys who could succeed which is why we know names today like ridgway, gavin and eisenhower. eisenhower began 1940 as lieutenant colonel, executive officer of an infantry regiment. marshall reached out and said that's who you need to be supreme allied commander. >> how did marshall rise the way he rose without going to battle. having the battle scars of world war i or world war ii. >> it was interesting. marshall didn't know him particularl
's your policy? >>> welcome back to "hardball." big news here in washington late today. cia director david petraeus has resigned his position over what he called an extramarital affair. nbc chief foreign affairs -- chief correspondent for foreign matters richard engel is with us along with david ignatius of the "washington post." let me go with you, richard, what do you make of this? it didn't seem -- what's the right word? it didn't seem to be freighted right. he's quitting over an extramarital affair, but why is he telling us about this? it doesn't seem like the normal washington scandal developing here. what's going on? >> well, the timing, we may have some new indications about the timing based on the information i'm about to say. this is what we know so far and what we've been able to confirm and is reportable. of course, the cia director today resigned, and he cited that extramarital affair. also we have learned from law enforcement sources and law enforcement officials that the fbi is now investigating, and this is an ongoing investigation, into paula broadwell. she is someone who h
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)